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Monday, May 18, 2020 | History

2 edition of The Northamptonshire and Rutland Domesday found in the catalog.

The Northamptonshire and Rutland Domesday

The Northamptonshire and Rutland Domesday

folios and maps : Northamptonshire: folios 219-229v, Rutland: folios 293-294, with excerpts from folios of Nottinghamshire, Leicestershire and Lincolnshire.

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Published by Alecto Historical Editions in London .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Facsimile.

Other titlesDomesday Book. Rutland.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18720852M
ISBN 100948459530

These pages give an overview of the Domesday Inquest, Great Domesday, and the purpose, structure, and terminology of Domesday Book, with references for further study. Domesday Explorer The text has been tagged with over , codes, and a powerful search engine lets you easily find entries of interest, map them, display the facsimile and the. Studies'; Wiltshire; Worcestershire, each in 2 volumes with a copy of 'Domesday Book. Studies' in slipcases (unless otherwise stated), numerous plates and folding maps, publisher's quarter cloth, folio, Alecto Historical Editions, (24).

Domesday Book: a complete translation, edited by Ann Williams and G.H. Martin (Penguin, ) Domesday Book seu liber censualis Willelmi primi regis Angliae, edited by A. Farley and others (4 vols., ) Domesday Book, vol. Bedfordshire, edited by John Morris (Phillimore, ) Domesday Book, vol. 5: Berkshire, edited by Philip Morgan (Phillimore, ). Domesday Book, the original record or summary of William I’s survey of England. By contemporaries the whole operation was known as “the description of England,” but the popular name Domesday—i.e., “doomsday,” when men face the record from which there is no .

Most of the counties of England were divided into hundreds from the late Saxon period and these were, with a few exceptions, effectively abandoned as administrative divisions in the 19th century. in some areas, equivalent districts were known as "wapentakes".. In Wales a similar Celtic system of division called cantrefi (a hundred farmsteads) had existed for centuries and was of particular. En el Domesday Book, la part nord-oest del comtat era esmentada com a una part annexa a Nottinghamshire; la part del sud-est era el wapentake de Wicelsea, pertanyent a Northamptonshire. La primera vegada que va ser esmentat com a conjunt va ser el , però posteriorment i fins al segle XIV se l'anomenava Soke de Rutland.


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The Northamptonshire and Rutland Domesday Download PDF EPUB FB2

Rutland. Latin, Roteland. The countyof Rutland was not fully formed in Part of the later county was included in Northamptonshire. In addition, Rutland was treated as an appendage to Nottinghamshire for certain purposes while some of its manorswere intermixed with holdingsin Lincolnshire.

See Charles Phythian-Adams, 'The emergence of Rutland and the making of the realm', Rutland Record. Northamptonshire and Rutland, County Edition: Domesday Book Studies, Introduction and Translation, Folios and Maps Alecto Historical Editions, London,£ As the nine hundredth anniversary of the Domesday Inquest approached, the Keeper of the Public Records decided that a facsimile of Domesday Book should be made using up-to-date.

Domesday Book holding from the King as overlord of whom 15 held in Rutland. About another 5, throughout England held as tenants directly of the King or of his tenants‑in‑chief by knight’s fees.

Of the latter, there were 16 in Rutland. Sadlythe majority of persons File Size: 1MB. rows  Northamptonshire. There were places in the county of Northamptonshire in. The Domesday Book records the names of each of three categories of landowners, the tenants-in-chief, the tenants in and the antecessors.

Throughout the whole of England about tenants-in-chief arc recorded in Domesday Book holding from the King as overlord of whom 15 held in Rutland.

Northamptonshire The following pages include Domesday place-names and landowners, and beneath some are links to websites containing the local history of that place. If you have a local history site that you would like to be included on these pages please get in touch via the Contact page.

All places. This page simply lists all places mentioned in Domesday Book. You may prefer to use the map. There are some towns and villages recorded in the Domesday Book, covering 40 of the old counties of England.

The majority of these still exist in some form today. Click on a county name on the map to continue, or use the list of links below it. To see full. Domesday Book encompasses two independent works (in, originally, two physical volumes): "Little Domesday" (covering Norfolk, Suffolk, and Essex), and "Great Domesday" (covering much of the remainder of England – except for lands in the north that later became Westmorland, Cumberland, Northumberland, and the County Palatine of Durham – and parts of Wales bordering, and included.

How the Domesday Book was compiled; What information is in the Domesday Book. How many Domesday places exist now.

Northamptonshire A-E. Abington. Abintone: Richard. Mill. Suburb of Northampton. Achurch. Asechirce: Azelin and 2 Englishmen from Peterborough. Abbey. Riverside. Also known as Thorpe Achurch. Rutland The following pages include Domesday place-names and landowners, and beneath some are links to websites containing the local history of that place.

If you have a local history site that you would like to be included on these pages please get in touch via the Contact page. Ketton was a settlement in Domesday Book, in the hundred of Witchley, mentioned in the chapters for Northamptonshire and Rutland.

It had a recorded population of households inputting it in the largest 40% of settlements recorded in Domesday (NB: households is an estimate, since multiple places are mentioned in the same entry). Place name: Bisbrooke, Rutland, Northamptonshire: Folio: r Great Domesday Book: Domesday place name: Bitlesbroch: People mentioned within entire folio.

The folios of Northamptonshire in Domesday Book. Uploaded by the Open Domesday project, released under CC-BY-SA by Professor John Palmer and George Slater.

For. E 31 - Exchequer: Treasury of the Receipt: Domesday Book etc; E 31/2/2 - Great Domesday: Huntingdonshire, Bedfordshire, Northamptonshire, Leicestershire, Warwickshire, Staffordshire, Shropshire, Cheshire, [Lancashire], This record (browse from here by hierarchy or by reference).

The northwestern part of the county was recorded as Rutland, a detached part of Nottinghamshire, in Domesday Book; the south-eastern part as the wapentake of Wicelsea in Northamptonshire.

It was first mentioned as a separate county inbut as late as the 14th century it was referred to as the 'Soke of Rutland'. Rutlandshire is an archaic and rarely used alternative name.

This document has been created by the History Data Service and is based on information supplied by the depositor SN - Electronic Edition of Domesday Book: Translation, Databases and Scholarly Commentary, Bibliography This is not a reading list for Domesday Book and is in no way intended to supplant Bates, A Bibliography of Domesday Book (), which can be supplemented by Hallam.

Buy Great Domesday Book: Northamptonshire and Rutland: County Edition Facsimile ed of limited ed () by Hall, D.N., Cain, T.D. (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible : D.N. Hall, T.D. Cain. Places in the Domesday Book associated with the name Countess Judith.

Belmesthorpe, Witchley, Northamptonshire / Rutland / Lincolnshire Bicker, Kirton, Rutland / Lincolnshire Boughton, Spelhoe, Domesday data created by Professor J.J.N. Palmer and team. Places in the Domesday Book associated with the name Robert. Open Domesday. Tolethorpe, Witchley, Northamptonshire / Rutland Torp, Land of Count Alan, Yorkshire Tymmor, Offlow, Staffordshire Uleham's [Farm], Wibrihtesherne, Essex Up Cerne, Sherborne.

We also find the county mentioned in Domesday Book, when it included much of Rutland, but in the reign of Henry II it was reduced practically to the area and shape which it has now. SOURCE: Brown, Malcom. Cambridge; University Press. Queries and Surnames.Hall, D.

'An introduction to the Northamptonshire Domesday', The Northamptonshire and Rutland Domesday, edited by Ann Williams and R.W.H. Erskine (), pages Hallam, Elizabeth M. Domesday Book through nine centuries ().in Domesday Book holding from the King as overlord of whom 15 held in Rutland.

About another 5, throughout England held as tenants directly of the King or of his tenants-in-chief by knight’s fees. Of the latter, there were 16 in Rutland. Sadly the majority of persons referred to in .